Oat and Quinoa Crackers

13/09/2016

I will be soon packing my stuff and getting ready to travel all the way to my motherland…Italy!

As I mentioned before, I come from unknown town of a few thousand souls called Pollenza, located in the Marche region. It is a small gem nestled in the blooming Italian countryside where people have a slow approach to living, a boasting longevity and a superior life quality. God bless!

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With my husband, we do fantasize about moving back there one day and raising our kids in the countryside, as my parents did with me. I have some vivid memories of fetching eggs in the chicken house or running after wild cats or, again, trying to catch as many fireflies as possible at night.

We both know that, behind our fancies, we wish to take a step back from “civilization” and be to look at the stars in the sky, away from the city lights. This is all to say that I do miss my home and I can’t wait to be back even if I have a long trip ahead!

Now, travelling comes with a full set of hassles such as queueing, waiting and craving for a proper sit-down meal when it is less possible. When hunger strikes at the airport and all I can see is junk food and soft drinks of all sorts….and I go totally nuts!

That’s why I like to drop in my purse some quick “healthy” bites for the (hungry) times to come, like these Oat + Quinoa Crackers.

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In order to lower the glycemic index of the recipe I have decided to work with oat flour (GI 45) and quinoa flour (GI 40).

Quinoa flour is gluten free, whereas oat flour is wheat free but not exactly gluten-free. In order to be suitable even for celiacs, it has to be specifically certified as gluten-free, meaning not sourced from a wheat contaminating process. Also, oat contains avenin, which is a protein similar to gluten that, as well, may not be tolerated by celiacs.

Also, to guarantee that perfect snap, I have added a teaspoon of psyllium flour (GI 0), which is optional but recommended. Psyllium (husk, powder, whole seeds) is gluten free and highly hygroscopic, helping to bind moisture, which creates a less brittle baked good when working with gluten free flours.

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This recipe is made with simple low Glycemic Index Ingredients (GI), if you want to know more about this concept and the philosophy of my site please visit the related page: The SNS Factor

Oat and Quinoa Crackers

  • Difficulty: low
  • Print

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Ingredients

  • 100 gr of quinoa flour
  • 150 gr of oat flour
  • 160 ml of water
  • 1/2 tablespoon of psyllium flour (optional)
  • 35 ml of olive oil (extravirgin for stronger taste)
  • 5 gr of salt
  • 3 gr of yeast or cream of tartar or baking powder
  • a pinch of paprika (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees and prepare a sheet of baking paper or gently oil the oven tray.
  2. Place all the ingredients in a bowl and mix them together until a stiff and sticky dough forms. Leave to rest for 10 minutes.
  3. Later, move the dough from the bowl to the baking paper or directly on the surface of the oiled oven tray.  Roll it using a small rolling-pin, I didn’t have it so I cut into half my paper towel cardboard roll. You want to roll it as thin as possible.
  4. Using a knife, slice into a large rectangular shapes. The sizes, and eventually the shapes, are completely up to you. Poke each cracker a few times with a fork.DSC_0346
  5. Leave to bake for 20 minutes. Later, turn each cracker over and continue baking for another 10 to 15 minutes, this will give you crisp crackers.  Mind that thinner crackers bake more quickly than thicker ones; you can remove the crackers as they brown to your liking.
  6. Watch that they don’t burn!!DSC_0355
  7. Once they are cooked, remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack.

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Store in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

Happy Healthy Baking!

Benedetta

 

 

 

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